Traveling Clues: how to travel when you’re 19, work part time & a student

traveling

Written for Credi Pty Ltd by Emily Judd

Travel (noun): To go from one place to another, as on a trip; journey.

It’s a dream we all have, whether it’s swimming with dolphins in the Bahamas or fine dining in Paris on a beautiful summer’s night. The need for travel brings us all together, it’s something we expect to experience at some point in our life- but sadly, not so much anymore. From a young age, my parents told me their exhilarating stories of traveling with friends in their teenage years. It became an expectation of mine that I would make the same memories. So I did what any young kid would do, I made a lemonade stand to make an income, which turned into a babysitting gig and now, a part-time sales assistant role. Travel is my dream, and I have never stopped working or saving to reach it.

However, I’m going to be completely honest, growing up in the 21st century is hard. No matter how much I worked there was always expenses in my way, whether that be textbooks for university, fuel or phone bills, it just didn’t seem to stop. My dream of traveling the world and experiencing exotic cultures slowly became more and more unrealistic. The tales my parents once told me seemed like a far cry and it was an unwelcomed reality check.

Not surprisingly, before long I found myself booking an appointment at my local bank to apply for a travel loan. When the day finally came, I walked into the bank with my parents, extremely excited at the prospect that my dream of travel may actually come true. But once again, there was another halt in my plans. I’m not sure if you’ve ever applied for a loan at my age, but I’ll tell you now, it’s a no go. Firstly, I’m a university student, secondly, I only work part-time and thirdly, I’m only nineteen. Three strikes and I was out. I ended up walking out of the bank in tears, not knowing what else I could possibly do to fulfill my dream of travel.

A few weeks later, my parents called me into the dining room to have a ‘chat’ a.k.a every teenager’s worst nightmare. I frantically started questioning everything I had done earlier in the week. Had I left the milk out? Had I not made my bed? Or did I suddenly turn into an underworld queen? Spoiler alert, I hadn’t. Instead, my parents put a piece of paper in front of me titled “The Bank of Mum and Dad”. It was a term that I had never heard before, however, everything changed that day.

My parents explained to me that through the assistance of lending platform Credi, they would be more than happy to loan me the money for my travels. Instead of fighting a losing battle with the banks and accepting to pay a crazy high-interest rate, my wonderful, amazing and beautiful parents would loan me the money- without interest! Credi allowed us to create a custom loan agreement and manage the whole process. For the first time since the tender age of six, exploring the world and all it had to offer seemed possible.

This saga occurred six months ago, and so much has changed since then. I am now sitting here writing this blog in Nice, France, whilst sipping on champagne. With the help of my parents and Credi, all my dreams came true and I have been able to travel the world. I can now return to Australia and tell all my friends and family about the wild adventures I got up to. AND I bet you can guess where I’ll be off to next- that’s right, the Bahamas to swim with dolphins!

 

Written for Credi Pty Ltd by Emily Judd

 

 

 

NOTE: The views and opinions expressed here are mine and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of Credi Pty Ltd.

Credi Pty Ltd (Credi) is not a bank, provider of legal advice or a financial lender.

Credi only provides a platform that allows friends, family and third parties to originate, negotiate and conclude loan agreements amongst themselves.

Credi does not provide legal advice, monitor or assess, agree, approve or decline any loan requests nor does the platform perform any funds transfer services.

Credi is not a law firm or legal practise, is not engaged in a legal practise and Credi does not act as lawyers or provide a legal service.

Nothing on this site should be considered is legal advice and you should consult a lawyer in your area to get specific legal advice and certainty of your legal rights and obligations.

The use of the Credi platform is governed by Credi’s Terms of Use.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *