What to do when reality hits!

reality hits

Written for Credi Pty Ltd by Alexandra Rough

Imagine you have just come home from your whirlwind six-week getaway to Europe. You have spent weeks walking, eating and taking thousands of photos of this, that and the other, not having a care in the world about your responsibilities waiting back at home for you. You have spent days lying on the beautiful Croatian coast, you have walked along the cobbled streets of Italy, eating ice-cream until you couldn’t eat anymore, you have wrestled with the thousands of tourists cramming into the Tube and all of a sudden you are now home and little did you know reality was about to hit you real hard. This was me, this is my story of being a twenty-something globetrotter whose travelers high came crashing down, fast!

Travelling around Europe was a dream I had had since my days in middle school, I spent my days scrolling through pictures of all the sites and places I wanted to go. I pinned pictures to my wall to keep me motivated to save and I meticulously planned my trip for a year in advance. I worked two jobs, tirelessly, throughout my first two years of university to pay for the trip. Being a uni-student and saving is not always the easiest thing to do, life is expensive and adulting is hard. I went away knowing I had a small amount in the bank to keep me safe for when I returned. I had a budget for my trip and to my surprise, I didn’t completely blow my budget and nor did I have to call the ‘Bank of Mum & Dad’ while I was away to bail me out, unlike a few of my friends… (but that is another story).

I have stepped off the plane, still slightly jet-lagged, I have a half unpacked suitcase, I have a pile of laundry the size of a small hill forming a nice blanket for my bedroom floor and I’m racing out the door to catch up with friends for the first time in weeks. I grab my car keys and jump into my car. My car and I have been everywhere together and I can’t remember a time that it wasn’t around, you see it has been with the family since before I was born and was graciously handed down to me when I first got my license. Before I left, my car precious car had definitely been showing some signs of aging, you could no longer wind the windows down and the doors were slightly unreliable, but I was confident it would go the distance. I go to put the keys into the ignition, excited to meet with my friends, but it doesn’t start. Nothing. Just the empty clicking sound of the engine trying to ignite and failing miserably. So I called the mobile mechanic service and there was nothing they could do to resurrect my helpless car.

Stranded and having the reality of life hitting me hard, I was faced with the impossibility of finding a car not only to catch up with my friends but for my everyday life of getting to work, university, sport and everything in between. What was I going to do? I had just come home, not having worked in weeks and had a bank account that hadn’t looked this low since middle school. My small amount of safety money wasn’t going to cut it. But I needed a car, public transport wasn’t an option, taxis are for the wealthy and cycling was pointless with our weather. I had to buy a new car. But how? I looked into buying a super cheap second-hand car that might last me a few months (at best) whilst I got my feet back on the ground or I could get a loan. With option 1 being ruled out due to the fact that I would soon be left with the same problem in the not too distant future, option 2 was the only way I was going to solve my little predicament. Then I had another choice, go to the bank, get a car loan, pay lots of interest and or book a meeting with the ‘Bank of Mum & Dad’ and beg them for a loan.

Luckily, my parents were willing to lend me the money to buy a new car and today as I rolled out of the dealership in my brand new, super shiny and very sleek new car I am so excited to go meet up with my friends and finally tell them all about my epic adventures! Now I just have to worry about making my repayments to them, but thankfully I don’t have to worry about that as Credi keeps on top of it all and makes it super simple for both me and my parents to stay informed and on top of the finances at all times!

 

Written for Credi Pty Ltd by Alexandra Rough

 

family loan agreement template

 

 

NOTE: The views and opinions expressed here are mine and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of Credi Pty Ltd.
Credi Pty Ltd (Credi) is not a bank, provider of legal advice or a financial lender. Credi only provides a platform that allows friends, family and third parties to originate, negotiate and conclude loan agreements amongst themselves. Credi does not provide legal advice, monitor or assess, agree, approve or decline any loan requests nor does the platform perform any funds transfer services.
Credi is not a law firm or legal practise, is not engaged in a legal practise and Credi does not act as lawyers. Nothing on this site is legal advice and you should consult a lawyer to get certainty of your legal rights and obligations.
The use of the Credi platform is governed by Credi’s Terms of Use.

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